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Tech_enhanced_writing_feedback

Page history last edited by Vance Stevens 6 months, 2 weeks ago

home

https://learning2gether.net

Writing in tech-enhanced multiliterate classrooms 

  

Unit 2

Utilize the voice capabilities of modern mobile, tablet, and PC devices

for improving effectiveness and efficiency in giving well-directed feedback on writing

 



Unit 2 of this workshop is in three parts

  • PART 1 demonstrates giving feedback using Google Docs and shows video evidence of its effectiveness.
  • PART 2 shows how the same feedback can be given using voice tools, freeing the teacher to move among the students, speak into a handheld device, and have the spoken feedback appear as comments in the student's Google Doc.
  • PART 3 shows how teachers can encourage writing fluency by speaking what students have written on paper into Google Docs, thus creating a digital version of the original on paper. 

 

Video evidence of the effectiveness of giving feedback using Google Docs

 

Working with students in Google Docs has the potential of setting up a Socratic dialog with writers as they improve their papers fluidlly while engaged in that dialog. This video demonstrates giving real-time feedback using Google Docs and shows video evidence of its effectiveness.

 


 

Giving feedback using voice tools inherent in the devices you can use for making comments in Google Docs 

 

PART 2 shows how the same kind of feedback can be given in class using voice tools, freeing the teacher to move among the students, speak into a handheld device, and have the spoken feedback appear as comments in the student's Google Doc.

 

Here’s how the teacher uses voice to make corrections in Google Docs to compositions which the students are in the process of revising on their own devices. 

 

  • The teacher logs on to Google Docs and puts a student's work on a data show connected to the device projecting there.
  • The teacher logs on to Google Docs on his mobile device and circulates in the space where the students are writing (as opposed to teaching from the front of the class), and advises them individually about revisions needed.
    • While advising, the teacher creates comments dialogs in the students' papers and speaks the comments into his/her device 
    • The comments appear in the composition the student is working on in Google Docs, and also on the data show at the front of the room where other students can see it
  • Each student acts on those revisions while the teacher works with them, or if the student needs more time, the teacher moves on to other students, repeating the process with each.

 

In order to demonstrate this, we need to simulate a class where workshop participants play the role of students, and like my students, create Google Documents and share them with me.

 

If you haven't already done so, create a document in Google Docs

TItle the document called swuic_your name

Share your document with me, for editing, at vancestev@gmail.com

 

I should be able to 

  • Find your document in my Google Drive
  • Display your document from my device onto room projection system
  • Open the same document on my mobile device
  • Make a comment using the voice feature on my device
  •  

You should be able to see the comment in your document

 

If you want to practice, share your document with someone else in the room

Comment using voice on one another’s documents

 

Part 2 of this workshop is derived in part from

Stevens, V.  (2015). Finding Your Voice: Teaching Writing Using Tablets with Voice Capability. TESL-EJ, 19(3), 1-11. Retrieved from http://tesl-ej.org/pdf/ej75/int.pdf; also available at http://www.tesl-ej.org/wordpress/issues/volume19/ej75/ej75int/

 

 

Using speech to READ student writing from paper into Google Docs and THEN working with them in Google Docs


PART 3 shows how teachers can encourage writing fluency by speaking what students have written on paper into Google Docs, thus creating a digital version of the original on paper. 

 

We probably won't have time to look at this part in detail, but you can read a detailed description here

https://docs.google.com/document/d/11GHi_E7u1yfcgsOW7DapcjLr9O9OCWKID3eQm3K9ljA/edit#heading=h.5o9mye88xgpv

 

Basically the technique is in two phases

  • Phase 1: The students start their writing on paper in class
    • They create and share a blank Google Doc with me.
    • The teacher then 
      • Speaks what they wrote on paper into their shared Google Docs. 
      • The teacher speaks in correct English what the students intended to say, correcting for them, and without further comment, their spelling, grammar, and punctuation. 
      • This allows them to focus on substance when revising their work in a follow-up class, after which these errors can be addressed using the digital tools available in Google Docs.
    • Prints out a hard copy of the student's work, 
      • Makes corrections and suggestions written on the hard copy, in particular addressing more global issues that the students might then work on.
  • Phase 2: The teacher returns the original paper (as it was handed in by the student) with printouts of what the students wrote expressed in correct language. 
    1. On the printouts are written suggestions for development of their ideas. 
    2. The students revise their work in Google Docs from these suggestions.
    3. The teacher addresses errors in each digital version, and the process repeats from step 1 for as many iterations as time allows.

 

  • Subsequent revision cycles address both accuracy and fluency, but the process starts with a digital version of the student's work which is not bogged down in errors from the outset. 

 

Reference

 

Stevens, V. (2019). Teaching writing to students with tablets using voice to overcome keyboard shortcomings. In W. Zoghbor, S. Al Alami, & T. Alexiou (Eds.). Proceedings of the 1st Applied Linguistics and Language Teaching Conference: Teaching and Learning in a Globalized World. Dubai: Zayed University Press, pp.22-47. Retrieved from https://www.zu.ac.ae/main/en/research/publications/_books_reports/2018/ALLT2018Proceedings.pdf 

If you want to see only Vance's article, it is here

https://www.vancestevens.com/papers/2019/ALLT2018_Proceedings_vstevensVoiceFeebback_onWriting.pdf

 

 

Time to be reflective

 

Finalize your documents with your impressions of what you have learned in this workshop

 

Participants can work individually OR TEAM UP!

  • Form pairs OR form groups 
  • Give your team a name

 

Discuss and write down

  1. What are your main take-aways from what we achieved in this workshop?
  2. How do you think you might use this with your students in your classes? 
  3. Do you have any comments or suggestions for the presenter of this workshop that might help improve it? 

 

Tweet what you have done using the workshop location-specific tag (on Jan 29 = #jan29swuic ) 

 

The suggested tagging site is Twitter

but there can be others if anyone can search that site by its tags (e.g. Flickr)

See http://workshops2020.pbworks.com/w/page/137978502/Model_Teacher_Unit_2#Createand/orposttoyourTwitterfeed

 

 

Submit your creation

 

When you have

  • Created an individual or group Google Doc and shared it with vancestev @gmail.com
  • and created a tagged artfact online that we can find in a Twitter or some other tag search,
    by searching on today's tag: #jan29swuic

 

Then, that's all we have time for

 

I hope you have enjoyed these workshops

 

If you want to join Vance online again some time on https://learning2gether.net 

you can find a listing of upcoming webinar events here: http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/w/page/32206114/volunteersneeded

Same URL but shorter: http://tinyurl.com/learning2gether

 

 

 

These materials were created by Vance Stevenshttps://learning2gether.net 

for presentation at  ELSpecialist workshops and ThaiTESOL in Thailand in January, 2020

You are free to share-alike and with attribution under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

The date of this update is January 24, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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